RTG 2670: Self-Organization of Soft Matter

via Multiple Noncovalent Interactions

Talents

Annika Blum

Annika Blum

Biochemistry to me is the understanding of life on a molecular level. Amphiphilic molecules and interactions of different chemical compounds determine the life of every organism. That’s why the research and understanding of amphiphilicity is of great importance. BEAM connects scientist of different fields and provides an environment of learning and communication. I am looking forward to learn from and with other scientists in the field of amphiphilicity.

Email: annika.blum@student.uni-halle.de

Nastaran Fatemi

Nastaran Fatemi

For me, biochemistry is the perfect combination of many life sciences that answer the basic but complex questions about life processes at the molecular level. Analysis of intermolecular interactions is a key component in understanding the concept of Amphiphilicity.

Nominated by: Prof. Kirsten Bacia

Email: nastaran.fatemi@student.uni-halle.de

Ali Hammoudi

Ali Hammoudi

The overwhelming urge for an inherent understanding of life led me to the path of Biochemistry. It is truly stunning how the nature produced a species, which is able to comprehend the complexity of life itself. The contributions of life sciences to this matter are too many and too wondrous to do justice to; being gifts given to a well deserving world. People are calling out once more to science to lead, with our world being beset on all sides by critical dilemmas. A great responsibility, which holds a lot of chances in it.

Email: ali.hammoudi@student.uni-halle.de

Philipp Hesse

Philipp Hesse

My motivation in developing a further understanding for the complexity of life defines my scientific research and studies as a biochemist. I believe that we can only face the upcoming issues of our modern world by working together as a team and by increasingly communicating the fundamentals of science to the width of society.

Nominated by: Prof. Kirsten Bacia

Email: philipp.hesse@student.uni-halle.de

Vanessa Jerschabek

Vanessa Jerschabek

The magic of science is stumbling over unexpected new discoveries and trying to understand and explaining those. Every little detail we discover will lead to a better understanding of nature and its smallest processes even if we do not know yet the purpose when we observe it first. I am looking forward for every little discovery we will find and which new ways we will pass down the road while working to put a new light on the complexity of amphiphilicity and all its facets.

Email: vanessa.jerschabek@student.uni-halle.de

Jana Krüger

Jana Krüger

Fremy's Salt is a well known dianionic radical widely used in EPR spectroscopy, but because of its charge it can't be used to measure negatively charged samples. This is why I am working in cooperation with a PhD student to synthesize a dicationic radical species that allows the study of anionic samples via EPR spectroscopy.

Nominated by: Prof. Dariush Hinderberger

Email: jana.krueger2@student.uni-halle.de

Johannes Kündiger

Johannes Kündiger

From surfactants in detergents to emulsifiers in chocolate, those substances are playing a big role in everyday life. And as a student in food science, I strive to understand these from a different point of scientific view. This project is my chance to learn and enhance scientific skills and experience up close what it takes to research in a scientifically topic. I’m glad to be a part in the project as a BEAM talent and I’m looking forward to have a great time.

Email: johannes.kuendiger@student.uni-halle.de

Sebastian Michler

Sebastian Michler

For me, it is always fascinating, how self-organization of amphiphilic molecules, especially via non-covalent interactions, enables the formation of macromolecules, membranes and cells, finally organizing complex and functional biological systems like the human organism. In my current research, I am comparatively analyzing the binding characteristics of human FABPs, a family of small transport proteins, which can non-covalently bind and transport fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands through the aqueous environment of our cells. Interestingly, there exists a large variety of FABPs assigned to different tissues, each of them playing significant roles in metabolic processes and diseases. While sharing a similar tertiary structure, they show strong differences in their amino acid sequences and binding characteristics. I want to get a deeper insight in this interesting circumstance, using modern physicochemical and biophysical methods.

Email: sebastian.michler@student.uni-halle.de

Marlene Schneider

Marlene Schneider

My name is Marlene Schneider. Since 2019 I have been studying food chemistry at Martin-Luther-Universität. In my opinion the project "Beyond Amphiphilicity" shows the diversity and the importance of chemistry which surrounds us every day. I am motivated to learn more about it and so I am looking forward to working in a group to get an insight into work especially into the scientific research of the project.

Nominated by: Prof. Dariush Hinderberger

Email: rosa.schneider@student.uni-halle.de

Katharina Schulz

Katharina Schulz

I am very grateful to get the opportunity to learn more about different projects and gain knowledge in workshops. Understanding the structure of molecular systems is the first step to benefit from them and I look forward to participating.

Email: katharina.schulz@student.uni-halle.de