RTG 2670: Self-Organization of Soft Matter

via Multiple Noncovalent Interactions

PhD Students

Muhammad Abu Bakar

Muhammad Abu Bakar

During my M. Phil/MS chemistry program I have worked on different research projects. I have experience of using Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy techniques. I have experience of synthesizing and characterizing nanoparticles and used these nanoparticles as biosensors for different biological applications. I have experience of different spectroscopic techniques such as NMR, UV-VIS, Infrared, ESR, Fluorescence and Mass spectrometry. My PhD thesis topic is "Synthesis and characterization of fluorophilic polymers". I am interested to synthesized different fluorophiic biopolymers and characterized these biopolymers by using different spectroscopic techniques such as Raman, 19F NMR, UV-VIS, Infrared, ESR, Fluorescence and Mass spectrometry.

Supervisor: Prof. Jörg Kreßler

Email: muhammad.abu-bakar@student.uni-halle.de

Marah Alqaisi

Marah Alqaisi

My research topic is focusing on understanding and engineering the structural organization of polyphilic polymers that is governed by the supramolecular interactions present within the polymer chains and synthesizing single-chain nano-particles (SCNPs) based on such interactions. What motivates me the most about scientific research in general and this topic specifically is not just the desire to be of service to the scientific society, it is also the curiosity of unraveling the causes behind scientific observations. The introduction of monomers of many different philicities in the polymer chain is proposing a unique organization that’s not well-understood yet. I believe such challenge will keep me occupied throughout my PhD journey!

Supervisor: Prof. Wolfgang Binder

Email: marah.alqaisi@student.uni-halle.de

Christian Anders

Christian Anders

During my bachelor and master thesis I learned what an exciting topic the synthesis and characterization of liquid crystalline substances can be. Through the targeted design of the molecules and the introduction of incompatible parts within a molecule, so many different organizational forms can be created that there is an incredible range of possibilities for the design of liquid-crystalline phases. My interest in further researching this spectrum and the experiment to generate liquid quasi-crystalline phases using the already known concepts have led me to pursue a PhD in the field of organic synthesis of liquid crystals in the working group of Prof. C. Tschierske.

Supervisor: Prof. Carsten Tschierske

Email: christian.anders@chemie.uni-halle.de

Virginia-Marie Fischer

Virginia-Marie Fischer

I will do a doctorate in the project “Design of liquid quasicrystals and their approximants”. My focus will be on modelling of self-organized specific matter, developing mathematical tools for abstract describing and explaining changes of structures. This fascinating project is a possibility to break new ground in the scientific world and to show that mathematics is more than calculation of chemical quantities. I am pleased to be a part of this and the BEAM-Team.

Supervisor: Prof. Rebecca Waldecker

Email: virginia-marie.fischer@mathematik.uni-halle.de

Melissa Frick

Melissa Frick

Melissa Frick obtained her Master of Science in Biochemistry at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany. In her PhD thesis she focused on the preparation and establishment of proteoliposomes for the analysis of membrane proteins by mass spectrometry. Currently, Melissa is interested in the fusion process mediated by the SNARE complex at the presynaptic terminal. To understand this process in detail she is establishing an artificial fusion system composed of protein nanodiscs and proteoliposomes.

Supervisor: Jun.- Prof. Carla Schmidt

Email: melissa.frick@bct.uni-halle.de

David Haselberger

David Haselberger

Project B3 will focus on studying the effect of macromolecular crowding on translational and rotational diffusion of proteins. The object of study will be bovine serum albumin and how the addition of multivalent cations such as Y³⁺ alters the rotational and translational dynamics of the system. Various NMR techniques ranging from NMR-relaxometry to pulsed-field-gradient NMR are used for this purpose. As a chemist by training, I have always been drawn to the field of physical chemistry. For my PhD, I am looking forward to learn and apply many new methods and hope to contribute new knowledge in the field of protein diffusion. https://www.physik.uni-halle.de/fachgruppen/nmr/

Supervisor: Prof. Kay Saalwächter

Email: david.haselberger@physik.uni-halle.de

Dominik Homann

Dominik Homann

My thesis is based on unspecific peroxygenases (UPOs) and their potential for non-natural known bioconversions. Especially radical reactions and the investigation of the mechanism is of particular interest for me. My motivation is to discover new and exciting reactions, which have not been described with enzymes yet.

Supervisor: Jun. - Prof. Martin Weissenborn

Email: dominik.homann@ipb-halle.de

Til Kundlacz

Til Kundlacz

Til Kundlacz obtained his Master’s degree in biochemistry from the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg. In his Master thesis, he studied the interaction of Synaptotagmin-1 with phospholipids using native mass spectrometry. The goal of his PhD project is the characterization of interactions formed between proteins and lipids or detergents. Til uses mass spectrometric methods (i.e. native MS and IM-MS) as well as biophysical methods such as ITC, DSC or IRRAS to achieve his goal.

Supervisor: Jun.-Prof. Carla Schmidt

Email: til.kundlacz@student.uni-halle.de

Florian Lehmann

Florian Lehmann

During my bachelor thesis I gathered experience in photocatalysis. After that I became a part of Prof. Dr. Dariush Hinderberger's group where I utilized EPR spectroscopy and EPR imaging to investigate protein hydrogels. Now I combine these knowledges about photochemistry and EPR spectroscopy to examine the influence of visible light on proteins, polymers and other materials. I currently work on the light-induced decay of monoclonal antibodies, photochemical Bergman cyclisation of main-chain enediyne polymers and characterization of radical formation in carbonitrides and Cer-MOFs under irradiation.

Supervisor: Prof. Dariush Hinderberger

Email: florian.lehmann@chemie.uni-halle.de

Sarah Neudorf

Sarah Neudorf

While studying biochemistry at Martin-Luther-University in Halle I became more and more fascinated by the complexity of proteins in terms of their interplay between their functions, biophysical properties and structural features. As part of the GRK2670 – Beyond Amphilicity - I am eager to elucidate protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions and the role of multiple interactions between multiple different particles.

Supervisor: Prof. Kirsten Bacia

Email: sarah.neudorf@chemie.uni-halle.de

Eliane Roos

Eliane Roos

Cellulose is one of the most abundant bio-polymers and has a broad range of applications. One limiting factor is its poor solubility in most solvents, resulting in a small fraction of cellulose being processed. Some ionic liquids can dissolve cellulose, but the reason is still not fully understood. My aim is an understanding of the solution process on a molecular level using ab-initio and force field molecular dynamics simulations. As a first step, I develop a number of force fields for cellulose and various ionic liquids. As hydrogen bonds play a key role for the solution process, a special focus is given on an accurate reproduction of the hydrogen bonds in these systems. By using these force fields, a deeper understanding of interactions, concentration-related effects, and the behavior of the system under external influences becomes possible.

Supervisor: Prof. Daniel Sebastiani

Email: eliane.roos@chemie.uni-halle.de

Anna Franziska Roth

Anna Franziska Roth

By trying to find new polymers that are formed through noncovalent forces, a new species of colloid-like ionic clusters has been discovered in 2012. These so-called „ionoids“, consisting of a multicationic molecular box and dipotassium methanedisulfonate, are monodisperse, spherical structures that form in DMSO:glycerole:water 50:43:7 (v/v/v) after 10 days of incubation. The goal of the doctorate is to better understand the forces that lead to the formation and high stability of these clusters with the help of different physico-chemical measuring methods.

Supervisor: Prof. Dariush Hinderberger

Email: anna-franziska.roth@chemie.uni-halle.de

Anna Luisa Upterworth

Anna Luisa Upterworth

In mixtures, diverse structural phenomena occur due to different philicities of the components. The concept of philicity can be understood as the result of competing intermolecular interactions of different nature, but a quantitative formulation of philicity in terms of interaction energies remains difficult. Our goal is to develope such a description in order to get a better understanding of how the interplay of interactions is related to structural phenomena in complex multi-component systems. For this purpose, we will use various methods of quantum-chemistry as well as classical and quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

Supervisor: Prof. Daniel Sebastiani

Email: anna-luisa.upterworth@chemie.uni-halle.de

Alena Winter

Alena Winter

The idea behind my PhD project is to increase the stability and crystallinity of Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs) by developing a new synthesis route: Initially, force-field optimized linkers with well-defined attachment points are designed and synthesized. Then, we synthesize Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), which arrange the linkers in space. These MOFs are then the starting point for the chemical transformation in the solid state leading to the formation of COFs. The highly crystalline MOF-template helps to overcome the crystallinity and stability problems and broaden the application of COFs.

Supervisor: Prof. Frederik Haase

Email: alena.winter@chemie.uni-halle.de